Cupcake Sail
Rare Words

rosettes:

acosmist - One who believes that nothing exists
paralian - A person who lives near the sea
aureate - Pertaining to the fancy or flowery words used by poets 
dwale - To wander about deliriously
sabaism - The worship of stars
dysphoria - An unwell feeling
aubade - A love song which is sung at dawn
eumoirous - Happiness due to being honest and wholesome
mimp - To speak in a prissy manner, usually with pursed lips

ritasv:

Ludlow Fayre087 by Andy Darby

ritasv:

Ludlow Fayre087 by Andy Darby

500daysofeffyou:

SpongeBob, where’s my order?

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Did you look under the tray?

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Oh. No I didn’t, sorry.

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the-seventh-sage:

A delightfully simple and abstract silhouette of Midna. ^^

the-seventh-sage:

A delightfully simple and abstract silhouette of Midna. ^^

By the first world war, soldiers swore so much that the word ‘fucking’ came to function as no more than ‘a warning that a noun is coming’.
Is there any way to pull off the "this character isn't dead" plot twist without making your reader facepalm?
Anonymous

clevergirlhelps:

  • Never found the body. This one is fairly common, to the point at which if someone is declared dead without a body in fiction, you can reasonably assume they’re alive somewhere.
  • Confusion. Another character could see the dead character “die”, but during a confusing moment. For example, someone could see the character die at night, in the middle of a battle, or while looking over their shoulder while running away. What might look like death might just be a fatal wound, but the other character is too scared/busy/etc. to take a close look.
  • OOC. The character dies in an out-of-character moment, or acts out of character for the moments leading up to their death. A boisterous character might suddenly become withdrawn before apparently overdosing on sleeping pills. A self-interested character might die in a blaze of selfless sacrifice for another.
  • Motives. The fake!dead character has a motive for disappearing (the extreme version of this is, of course, dying). They could be a mentor and want their student to draw strength from their death. Their loved ones could be under threat and they need to disappear to ensure their safety. You should probably make these motives within the guessing realm of most readers. That way, they can assume the character isn’t dead and it comes only as a mild shock. Sometimes overlaps with OOC, as the character’s new motive makes them behave differently. 
  • Secondhand source. The reader hears about the character death from another source that is usually trustworthy, but in this case has been deceived or is lying to achieve their own ends. Sometimes overlaps with not finding the body, since the reader has to take the source’s word for it that the character is dead.
  • Hints. There are hints throughout the story that the character isn’t dead. For example, Bobby Singer in Supernatural, while dead, is still hanging around as a ghost. He moves some significant pictures, empties some beer bottles, and throws out good reference cards. Sam and Dean put it down to good luck, but eventually realize it’s Bobby’s presence. Your dead character could do things like sending anonymous flowers to their loved ones, fixing up their grave, or returning to their house to get or rearrange things (other characters would notice something is off with the house).

legendoftotodile:

hollandmartinn:

r0ki:

thatrockerdude:

chabothedino:

cryforce:

thewriterkid:

Fun things to say when someone tells you they’re going to go to the bathroom:

  • Stay safe
  • Congratulations
  • That’s what they all say
  • Different strokes for different folks
  • I hope you have the time of your life
  • But you have so much to live for
  • Please explain
  • think of me
  • Don’t fall in
  • I’ll alert the media
  • Good luck
  • Have fun
  • Mention my name and you’ll get a good seat
  • Do you need me to help you aim?